Home Cinema: Ane Hjort Guttu/Daisuke Kosugi

The Lost Dreams of Naoki Hayakawa (2016)
15.04.20 – 22.04.20

Kunstnernes Hus Home Cinema is bringing a handpicked selection of our favourite films home to you, with a new film being published every Wednesday at 6 pm. The third film in our series is The Lost Dreams of Naoki Hayakawa (2016) by Ane Hjort Guttu and Daisuke Kosugi.

The film will be available from Wednesday, April 15, 6 pm until Wednesday, April 22, 6 pm.

Interview with the filmmakers

Learn more about the film through this digital interview. Artist and worker at Kunstnernes Hus Kino Jon Vogt Engeland in conversation with Ane Hjort Guttu and Daisuke Kosugi in the video below.

About the film

The Lost Dreams of Naoki Hayakawa centres around Japanese art director Naoki Hayakawa's recollection of his working life in the advertisement business in Tokyo, presented through interviews. Hayakawa often worked 12 to 16 hours a day, including weekends. The immense work pressure made him develop a state between sleep and wakefulness, in which he dreamt strange and wonderful dreams. These dreams are staged throughout the film, creating a mixed state between reality and fantasy. When he tells his superiors about his condition, he is told to exploit his dreams by using ideas he gets from them in his work. Informed by surrealist film, as well as experimental cinema from the 1960s and 1970s, The Lost Dreams of Naoki Hayakawa revolves around post-Fordist working conditions: what demands on employees do to family and gender structures, and what impact they have on the personal psyche.

About the filmmakers

Ane Hjort Guttu (b. 1971) is a Norwegian artist and filmmaker based in Oslo. She works in a variety of media, but has in recent years mainly concentrated on film and video works, ranging from investigative documentary to poetic fiction. Among recurrent themes in her work are the relationship between freedom and power, economy and the public space, social change and limits of action. Guttu is also a writer and curator, and she is a professor at the National Academy of the Arts, Oslo.

Daisuke Kosugi (b. 1984, Tokyo) is a Norwegian artist who lives and works in Oslo. In film, sculpture, performance and text, Kosugi constructs seductive scenarios that entail an underlying conflict between personal freedom and systems. Whether by portraying how creativity is mined by the creative industry in a Post-Fordist labour market, or through a narrative of creativity that is not convertible to economic or cultural measures of productivity, Kosugi unpacks these struggles through the lives of individuals. His semi-autobiographical films guide audiences through intimate experiences where the conflict is rendered bodily and emotional. Through layers of fiction and non-fiction he constructs a self-reflective mode of viewing, a method of storytelling developed from his interest in empathy and the incommunicability of pain.

About Kunstnernes Hus Home Cinema

Kunstnernes Hus Cinema is closed until further notice. But we intend to continue supporting both Norwegian and international filmmakers through making their films available to our public. We're therefore thrilled to launch Kunstnernes Hus Home Cinema.

This is how it works: a new film will be available for viewing on our website each Wednesday at 6pm. The films chosen are either movies shown at our cinema or a work by a filmmaker that will come to visit us later in the year, to familiarise the audience with his or her practice. Each film will be available for a week. In addition, short interviews will be published, where filmmakers talk more about their film as well as their experience of this peculiar time.

Kunstnernes Hus Home Cinema is free for everybody. Should you want to support us, our team, the filmmaker or the artist, feel free to become a member of Kunstnernes Hus or vipps us any amount that you like (Vipps: 563558).

Thank you and happy watching!

Title
The Lost Dreams of Naoki Hayakawa
Director
Ane Hjort Guttu
Screenplay
Ane Hjort Guttu and Daisuke Kosugi
Year
2016
Country of origin
Norway
Duration
25 min
Language
English